Uncategorised

Referendum on Pervez Musharraf and Standoff of 2001–2002

On April 30, 2002, Imran Khan travelled to Islamabad to cast his ballot. His PTI companions shouted “Allah is the Greatest” as he cast his ballot. Pervez Musharraf received the support of Imran Khan in order to continue serving as president of the nation for another five years. A president is chosen in accordance with the Constitution by the National Assembly, the Senate, and the four provincial assemblies. But there were no assemblies. The assemblies had already been disbanded by General Musharraf. So, how was this referendum conducted?

Who was the Chief Justice who had a reputation among other justices for taking bribes? In their respective terms, he provided Musharraf and received from him a technical extension. All of this took place as a million Pakistani and Indian soldiers faced off against each other on the frontiers. What tale was this? I am Faisal Warraich, and I shall demonstrate all of this in Dekho, Suno, Jano’s Golden Jubilee episode of Pakistani History. On December 13, 2001, the Indian parliament in Delhi adjourned at roughly 11 a.m.

When the shooting began, the members of the Indian parliament, or “Lok Sabha,” were returning. After throwing grenades inside the Parliament building, four or five terrorists started shooting from the outside. Terrorists had attacked the Indian parliament. 18 people were hurt and up to 12 people died in that attack. The Indian Interior Minister immediately placed the responsibility for these attacks on Pakistan. Members of the BJP began discussing bombing Pakistan. The Indian Interior Ministry identified “Lashkarae Tayyaba” and “Jaishe Muhammad” as the attacks’ masterminds. India pressed Pakistan to detain those guilty for the strikes.

Pressuring Pakistan to take action against the assailants within a few days was done by the Indian PM and Interior Minister. They warned that if Pakistan did not take adequate action against these organisations, they would lose patience. General Musharraf claimed that the Pakistani army was likewise on high alert in response to the Indian threats. India must therefore avoid taking any risks. If India had evidence that Islamabad had been involved in that terrorist event, it should have shared it with Pakistan. In this situation, India used active diplomacy and made contact with diplomatic embassies around the globe. As a result, condemnation of terrorism spread from East to West.

George W. Bush offered India the FBI team’s services to look into this act of terrorism. However, negotiations moved beyond diplomatic statements and conversations. Atal Behari Vajpayee, the prime minister of India, moved its 700,000 troops to the Pakistani border on December 20, 2001. After the war of 1971, it was the Indian army’s largest military mobilisation. The Indian military operation was designed to attack and destroy jihadi centres located within Pakistan. This strategy was known as “Operation Karakram” by Indian strategists. Was Pakistan prepared to take on this enormous responsibility given that it was already dealing with the effects of 9/11? General Musharraf claimed that Pakistan was prepared to take on the challenge posed by India.

He informed India that Pakistan was prepared to respond to their actions. The movement of 300,000 Pakistani soldiers to the frontiers was ordered. 700,000 Indian and 300,000 Pakistani forces faced off in the chilly month of January 2002, from the deserts of Sindh and Rajisthan to the snow-covered highlands of Siachin. These two nuclear nations narrowly avoided an atomic war in Kargil just two years ago. They were back where they had been at the beginning. However, this time, things were different. that Pakistan and India had requested American intervention at the time of Kargil. But this time, America had just had experienced 9/11.

In Afghanistan, too, America required Pakistan’s assistance. In this regard, agreements have been reached between the US and Pakistan. The US did not want Pakistan to focus on India instead of Afghanistan. George Bush, the president of the United States, contacted Pakistan and India as a result. He spoke with the leaders of the two nations and reminded them to remain calm and patient as normal. He requested that General Musharraf outlaw Jihadi organisations. George Bush made significant announcements on January 12, 2002, either as a result of external pressure or for US national interests. He imposed a ban on several Jihadi groups and individuals in Pakistan. Hafiz Saeed, the leader of Lashkar-e-Tayyaba, was also detained.

A few months later, the leader of a sectarian group, Lashkare Janghvi Riaz Busra, also perished in a police shootout. Although this organisation had no connection to Kashmir, Musharraf’s action against it was part of his anti-sectarian campaign. These actions prevented an impending war between India and Pakistan in this standoff. However, both nations’ armed forces persisted in holding their positions, and the situation grew worse over the next few days. The two forces engaged in skirmishes along the Line of Control (LoC). As both sides started to lose lives, the diplomatic issues took on an emotional hue. India maintained its diplomatic onslaught and phoned Pakistan’s high commissioner. India also prohibited Pakistani aircraft from flying across its airspace.

War loomed enormous once more as a menace. When the likelihood of war increased, Russia and the Arab states also took action to reduce the tension. Before these attempts could be successful, a significant incident happened. An ambush in Kaluchak’s Held Kashmir neighbourhood claimed the lives of Indian soldiers and members of their families. India once more blamed Lashkare Tayyaba and Pakistani intelligence services for the incident. The war that the major countries were attempting to stop may now happen again. On May 22, 2002, Indian Prime Minister Vajpayee arrived in the same Kaluchak region.

He gave the Indian army orders to prepare for a decisive assault. It was a unique circumstance because the Indian BJP government was under intense pressure from its voter base. In Pakistan, there was also pressure on General Musharraf. Musharraf was under pressure from the US, the UK, and India to take a tough stance against jihadi organisations while… in Pakistan he was forced not to feel pressure from India. Musharraf responded to pressure coming from both of these directions. After the court released Hafiz Saeed due to a lack of evidence against him, he was detained once more.

Musharraf also declared his intention to stop aiding the jihad in Kashmir. He declared that no group would be permitted to promote terrorism in Kashmir under the guise of jihad. He also stated that Pakistan was prepared to go to war at the same time. Musharraf wants to show India his might in addition to his words if war could be avoided. Pakistan announced that it would test-fire ballistic missiles equipped with atomic warheads. The globe was enraged by Pakistan’s revelation. Since India had also placed nuclear warhead transport missiles close to Pakistan’s border.

Musharraf also declared his intention to stop aiding the jihad in Kashmir. He declared that no group would be permitted to promote terrorism in Kashmir under the guise of jihad. He also stated that Pakistan was prepared to go to war at the same time. Musharraf wants to show India his might in addition to his words if war could be avoided. Pakistan announced that it would test-fire ballistic missiles equipped with atomic warheads. The globe was enraged by Pakistan’s revelation. Since India had also placed nuclear warhead transport missiles close to Pakistan’s border.

The three-day testing of atomic warhead-capable long, medium, and short-range missiles made international headlines. The UK now expressed alarm, and Japan also suggested suspending aid to Pakistan. At the international level, these three days have been tense. because a small error or conflict could result in an atomic conflict. The fundamental cause was that neither country at the time had a missile defence system. Even their early warning system wasn’t very sophisticated. Therefore, if one country fired a missile and the other learned about it, the other would have to follow suit as there would be no other opportunity to retaliate.

The three-day testing of atomic warhead-capable long, medium, and short-range missiles made international headlines. The UK now expressed alarm, and Japan also suggested suspending aid to Pakistan. At the international level, these three days have been tense. because a small error or conflict could result in an atomic conflict. The fundamental cause was that neither country at the time had a missile defence system. Even their early warning system wasn’t very sophisticated. Therefore, if one country fired a missile and the other learned about it, the other would have to follow suit as there would be no other opportunity to retaliate.

Richard Armitage received assurance from Musharraf that Pakistan would not dispatch mujahideen to occupied Kashmir. Armitage immediately left for India after this promise. Additionally, he received assurance from Indian Prime Minister Vajpayee that India would not try to strike Pakistan. The Americans announced a deescalation in hostilities between India and Pakistan on June 7, 2002. It was obvious that the US should claim credit for it. I want to tell you about something essential. An Indian spy jet flew into Pakistan on the same day the US issued its declaration.

Although this plane was shot down, both states refrained from making a big deal out of it by treating it as a minor mishap. So they continued to move at the pace they had set for returning things to normal. According to intelligence sources, Pakistan had stopped the Mujahideen from travelling to IOK. Following that, the Indian prime minister declared that India will respond positively to Pakistan. India would act in this regard in a number of ways. India thus allowed Pakistan access to its airspace as a first step. Then, the missiles carrying Indian ships also retreated to a neutral location. Additionally, India announced the selection of a new high commissioner to Pakistan.

On the border and the Line of Control, however, a million soldiers from each nation stood face to face. Therefore, the prospect of war had not completely subsided. Three elements that usually worked in similar circumstances eliminated these risks. These were the purpose, the weather, and the money. The goal of “Operation Parakram” had been forgotten by the Indian army. because it no longer had the opportunity or circumstance to attack Pakistan suddenly or perform a surgical strike. because Pakistan had promised not to support the jihadi groups in Kashmir through the US. Second, Pakistan possessed a strategic defensive position thanks to India’s strike corps’ delayed movement.

The hardships that the forces faced in the hills, deserts, and jungles were made worse by the weather in July and August. In addition, the army’s lengthy deployment at the offensive position was having an impact. India was paying the stand-off army Rs. 70 million each day. According to Gen. Musharraf, Pakistan spent $1.04 billion on Operation Parakram defence. The 10-month Amry standoff was estimated to have cost over $1.15 billion by Indian ministers. The troop’s and the people’s transportation and relocation were not included in these costs. After a standoff lasting nine to ten months, the two impoverished nations were unable to bear the cost of this “heroism.”

In that standoff, surprising these 2 states lost around 2000 soldiers without starting a formal conflict. Therefore, on October 16, the Indian Defense Minister declared that the planned goals had been attained despite the lost purpose, the bad weather, the high expense, and obviously the pressure from the rest of the globe. And the army was being recalled to the peaceful positions. Pakistan likewise made the announcement to withdraw its soldiers from the front line areas on October 17, 2002. However, there was still a crucial point. Gen. Musharraf had an additional five years to hold onto power during that protracted and unusual conflict. How?

You must have seen the History of Pakistan episode 45. You were given the full story of a contentious legal ruling in that episode. Because of this, General Musharraf engaged in shady business with Irshad Hassan Khan, a prominent judge on the Supreme Court. Saeeduz Zaman Siddiqi, the Chief Justice of Pakistan, was also detained along with other justices. Justice Irshad was named Pakistan’s Chief Justice by General Musharraf, who also received the decisions of his choosing. Musharraf was given three years by Justice Irshad to carry out the military regime’s programme after he made the decision to defend his overthrow of the Nawaz Sharif administration. Then, the authority would be handed up to the chosen officials.

It implied that Musharraf would step down from office after three years. However, Pervez Musharraf was opposed to it. He was to carry out his development and moderation programme. And he once required the Supreme Court’s assistance in a legal matter. Interestingly, he received the assistance and the judges. Even more intriguing was the fact that Justice Irshad’s close relative was the judge who granted this relief. In February 2002, the same judge was elevated to the position of Chief Justice of Pakistan. Shiekh Riaz Ahmad, the Chief Justice, was prepared to extend Musharraf’s term in exchange for an extension of his own. Yes, both the Chief Justice and General Musharraf wished to extend their terms.

So both parties extended their respective terms. While the other utilised the justice scales, one exploited the power. In his book “A History of the Judiciary in Pakistan,” former president of the Supreme Court Bar Hamid Khan stated that… Justice Sheikh Riaz was known as a “corrupt” judge who would not hesitate to accept payment for his services. The same judge so served a purpose in the General Musharraf case. Rafiq Tarar was removed from this position in June 2001 when General Musharraf took office as president. In order to extend his term in office past the three years that Justice Irshad had granted him, he requested an additional five years. Musharraf sought court backing to accomplish this goal.

The Senate and the assemblies are now part of the electoral college for the presidential election under the Constitution. But the assemblies had already been disbanded by General Musharraf. The Pakistani Constitution was likewise put on hold or suspended. Because he lacked constitutional support, he followed the rules established by the dictators who came before him. The referendum was that. He declared that a referendum would be held to ask for a vote on continuing as president for an additional five years. As you may remember, this was all occurring as the Indo-Pak forces were in a standoff. And a conflict seemed to be coming soon. Musharraf instructed the Election Commission to set up for the referendum’s holding as a result.

Who was named the Chief Election Commissioner, do you know? Justice Irshad Hassan Khan was there. The vote on whether to keep Musharraf as president for an additional five years in order to forward a democratic agenda, reforms, and eradicate terrorism, ensure stability, and remake Pakistan in the image of Qauid-e-Azam was scheduled for April 30, 2002. Yes and no options were provided under this writing. Political parties in the nation were divided after the referendum announcement. The referendum was opposed by the PPP, PML(N), JI, and some other parties. While Dr. Tahirul Qadri’s PAT, the MQM, and the PTI backed the referendum.

At their separate levels, both sides launched their demonstrations. General Musharraf spoke at the rallies and demonstrated his strength by waving his boxes in an effort to win over the electorate. Imran Khan and Dr. Tahirul Qadri were staunch supporters of his. They were planning programmes and making speeches. During a gathering at Karachi University, Imran Khan had to deal with the resentment of the IJT students. He nevertheless persisted in backing the vote. The protest rallies were organised by ARD on behalf of the referendum opponents. At the Minare Pakistan, speakers were in attendance while the referendum as a legal problem was discussed in court.

The Supreme Court heard a challenge to the referendum’s conduct while Justice Sheikh Riaz was present. He presided over the nine-person court set up to hear the petitions objecting to the referendum. The referendum was overwhelmingly approved by the Bench just two days before April 30. All referendum-related petitions were rejected by the court. Rafiq Tarar’s claim that he was not removed as president in accordance with the constitution was likewise rejected by the court. After Justice Sheikh Riaz approved the referendum, the game was in CEC Irshad Hassan Khan’s hands. Justice (retired) Irshad Hassan, the chief election commissioner, made a superb decision.

voter lists for the Gen. Ayub and Gen. Ziaul Haq referendum were available at the polling places. After a person had voted, his name was supposed to be crossed off the list. They also aided in locating the voters associated with a specific voting place. Irshad Hassan Khan, CEC, made the decision to withhold the voter lists from the voting places. This law allowed voters to cast multiple ballots at the same or separate polling places. While Gen. Musharraf was working to win the referendum, another “player” at the same time… was quite busy making political moves to support Musharraf’s efforts.

Brig. Ijaz Shah, the secretary of the interior, was this person. Yes, the current interior minister is the same person. Then, Brig. Ijaz Shah publicly threatened to deal harshly with anyone who tried to obstruct the referendum. Next came April 30, 2002. In the morning, there was no activity at the polling places. But as the day went on, some activity was noticed. Numerous influential political figures, including General Musharraf, exercised their right to vote. Along with his supporters, Imran Khan went to the polling place and voted in favour of Musharraf. Imran Khan also explained his decision to vote in favour of the army chief in the poll.

“I want to vote for General Musharraf because I hope he can keep the corrupt out of the democratic process,” the voter stated. The referendum ended to being contentious, just like previous ones had been. A presiding officer who cast 500 ballots at a polling location in Rawalpindi was reported by foreign institutions. While the Opposition flatly rejected the referendum, international organisations openly questioned its validity. Money from local bodies and public employees were grossly misappropriated for the referendum.

The government and ISPR spokesman Rashid Qureshi rejected any irregularities and insisted that it was impossible for the administration to exert pressure or otherwise take advantage of the public personnel. The referendum’s outcome, which was made public on May 1, caught everyone off guard. The referendum had the greatest turnout in Pakistani election history, according to CEC Irshad Hassan Khan. The attendance rate was 70%. History revealed that voter turnout rarely reached a high of 50%. Only the 1971 elections saw a 63 percent turnout, and 98 percent of those voters chose General Musharraf. “2% are negative, but 98% are positive.”

Since CEC had not requested voter lists for the polling places, the vote cast could not be verified again. The victory of General Musharraf was described by the opposition as his “backdoor entry” into the White House. The Chief Justice received a three-year extension on his contract after validating the referendum. By using the authority granted to him by the judiciary to change the Constitution, General Musharraf increased the retirement age for Supreme Court justices from 65 to 68 years.

The High Court judges’ retirement age was raised from 62 to 65 years old. As the initial and primary beneficiary of this decision, Chief Justice Sheikh Riaz was granted an additional three years in office. Musharraf declared general elections would take place on October 10, 2002, following the completion of this agreement. However, he created a “King’s party” before of the elections for which the NAB and intelligence services were employed. How were these elections conducted? Who was the NAB Chairman and how were the elections impacted by this organisation?

How was the Al-Qaeda network that had entered Pakistan destroyed? All of this will be demonstrated for you in the upcoming episode of Pakistan’s History. We have hinted at the covert meetings between General Musharraf and Justice Irshad Hassan. Click here to read the full article on it and here to learn why Faiz Ahmad Faid wrote it. The phrase “Hum jo tereek rahon mein maray gaye” (we are, who lost their lives in the dark passages). And now for the history of the western sunrise location.Contact Us

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button